ESPD 50

Ethnopharmacologic Search for Psychoactive Drugs

ESPD 50
SPEAKERS

Stephen Szára

Stephen Szára

A Scientist Looks at the Hippies.

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“In this paper, the hippie lifestyle is described in details, as I saw it. Also the most popular drugs that seemed to play a significant role in their life are discussed.”

Biography

Szára, Stephen István, MD, DSc, chemist, pharmacologist, psychiatrist, consultant; born Budapest, Hungary, March 21, 1923; arrived in U.S., 1957; son of János Szára and Mária Katona; married Madeleine Gadányi, Sept. 5, 1959 (div. June 1980); one child Christopher b. March 18, 1970.


Edu: D of Natural Sciences, Petrus Pázmány U., Budapest, 1950; MD, Medical University, Budapest, 1951.


Employ: Asst. prof. dept. biochemistry Med. U. Budapest, 1950-53; chief biochemistry lab. State Institute for Nervous Disorders, Budapest, 1953-56; vis. scientist Clin. Sci. Lab. NIMH, Bethesda, Md., 1957-61, sect, chief Washington, 1961-71; branch chief NIDA NIH, Rockville Md., 1971-90; sci. cons. Kensington, Md., 1990-; Assoc. clin. prof. psychiatry George Washington U. 1966-75.
Mem: Emeritus Fellow of ACNP and CINP, member of AAAS, Am. Soc. Pharmacology and Exp. Therap., and member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Heffter Research Institute. He was elected Honorary Member of the Hungarian Association of Psychopharmacology (2007). He is also recipient of ADAMHA Administrator’s Meritorious Achievement Award (1984) and the Kováts Medal of Freedom from the American Hungarian Federation (2005).


Achievements include: Co-authoring 2 books, co-editing 4 books; contributing about 90 articles to professional journals; also discovering the hallucinogenic effects on NN-Dimethyl-tryptamine in man.


Partly copied from: Marquis Who’s Who in the World 25th Ed, 2007.

A Scientist Looks at the Hippies.

“Some psycho-social and scientific commentary are proposed for dealing with the social and medical problems of the hippie phenomenon.”

Transcript abstract

This is a historical report, in the sense that it was prepared in 1967, the year the first Ethnopharmacology Symposium was held in San Francisco and where I was first alerted to the Hippie movement. Later that year I went back to the West Coast on the request of my Director at NIMH to check on the validity of sensational TV and newspaper articles with special attention to drug use and abuse. A report was prepared and submitted to him in January 1967, but I was not allowed to publish it.


In this paper, the hippie lifestyle is described in details, as I saw it. Also the most popular drugs that seemed to play a significant role in their life are discussed. Some psycho-social and scientific commentary are proposed for dealing with the social and medical problems of the hippie phenomenon.


This report is presented essentially unchanged, except for some editing of expressions that are not appropriate today. This is the first time, after 50 years, that this report is published in full. Only a few excerpts had been quoted in a 1998 book in Cheryl Pellerin’s “Trips” with permission. This book has also been translated into German and French.